My Own Daylily Bed

Canning Daylily Gardens
Canning Daylily Gardens

As some of you you may recall  ( OfGardens July 16, 2013  Daylily Delights) I am having a real summer crush on day lilies. After many hours of sighing and coveting the day lilies of others, I decided to be proactive and pursue my new love interest. I have created my own day lily bed.

 

Here in Nova Scotia where I spend part of the summer there is an excellent day lily nursery, Canning Daylily Garden   (http://canningdaylilygardens.yolasite.com),  which I have been wanting to visit for quite some time. On a gorgeous summer’s day, a friend and I drove to Canning with a long list of wants.  Almost immediately upon arrival Ryan Ward, the owner, greeted us and offered help. From that moment until we drove off he never left our sides and was extremely helpful in every way: he found the day lilies on our list, chose from those available the ones with the largest fans, packed them up, carried them to the car, loaded the car AND gave us each two free day lilies because of the number of plants we purchased. We had a lot of fun acquiring the day lilies, which is always a good harbinger for a project.

Daylilies at Canning
Daylilies at Canning

Back at my cottage, it was time to plant. I had dug a trench 22 feet long by 2 feet wide and 12 inches deep. I filled the  bottom of the trench with composted manure,

Before
Before

and then the rest with a combination of old and new soil.

During
During

I then planted the day lilies 20 inches apart, more or less. This is a little wider apart then most often recommended, 12 – 18 inches is the popular recommendation,  but I don’t want to have to divide the bed anytime soon so I over compensated with space now. Watered deeply (and often since), then mulched. It is so easy to plant in a new bed filled with fresh soil!

After
Newly planted bed

My new bed of daylilies are all red: Doug’s Red Mercedes, Baja, Little Zinger, Mildred Brothers, Imperial Fire, Imperial Guard, and Crown Fire. Hopefully, this is what my daylilies will look like this time next year:

Baja Daylilies
Baja Daylilies

 

 

 

 

26 thoughts on “My Own Daylily Bed

  1. There is a home here on River road with an extraordinary planting of day lilies – it is the same lovely home with a new & growing orchard going up the hill – I think Patrick lusts after it. Just kidding. Anyway they have a wonderful collection including a variety that seems white although it may actually be a very very pale yellow.

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    1. How lovely! I hope to see it sometime. Gentle Shepard is the only real white daylily I know of…Joan Senior is white, with too much yellow for my all white garden. But there are a lot of pale yellow.

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  2. What a surprise – to see your post about the Canning daylilies. Canning is located just over an hour’s drive from Chester and our garden club has benefited from many fine specimens purchased at Ryan’s nursery. I hope you have a great holiday at your cottage.

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    1. the orange daylilies are stalwarts in gardens in my part of the world, affectionately nicknamed “ditch lilies”! I love them, too, but since I had the opportunity to start from a blank slate, I liked the idea of all read, not a very common daylily color.

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    1. I am looking forward to a spectacular display. I am glad to have your endorsement of Baja. It was in bloom at the nursery and I love the intense red. The nursery owner said Doug’s Red Mercedes was the best red they had, but it wasn’t in bloom so I haven’t seen it yet. If it it better than Baja I will be a very happy gardener.

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  3. We used to have a ton of daylilies of all different kinds on the farm where I grew up. I particularly loved a soft peach colored one and also the soft yellows. Your pictures are beautiful.

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    1. One of the best attributes of daylilies is the myriad of colors they come in. I like that you grew up on a farm that had “a tone of daylilies of all different kinds”. Thanks for your compliment about my photographs!

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  4. I love daylilies and fall for them over and over. But the ones I have do seem truly to just bloom for a day – which is fine, – but they don’t shed their dead flowers and the result tends to look manky. Spoiling the overall effect.

    Do you think this is about the varieties I’m growing?

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    1. Daylilies don’t shed their dead flowers. If you want your day lilies to look pristine, you will have to “deadhead” them yourself. I don’t mind the faded flowers, although I do deadhead them whenever I get the chance. I have one friend who has a serpentine bed of hundreds of day lilies, he deadheads his!

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      1. O. Hmm. Don’t quite see how it’s possible to look at something with real pleasure if you’re also seeing hundreds of deadheads needing careful removing. And if you’re not careful you take off buds too! Doh! But they are beautiful. Are the nearer to species better looking with their deadheads than the later hybrids I wonder?

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  5. Good question…I don’t know the answer, I will have to find out. Personally, the spent blooms don’t distract me. I deadhead very occasionally and let nature take it’s course.

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